Mune, Guardian of the Moon

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Days and nights go by, one by one, but do we ever wonder how does it happen, how day becomes night and the other way around? Who is guarding the Moon and the Sun? What does it make them so powerful? The animated movie “Mune, Guardian of the Moon” sets a point of view on this issue.

The movie directed by Alexandre Hebovan, who worked within the animation department for “Monsters vs Aliens”, “Kung Fu Panda” and “Azur & Asmar: The Princes Quest”, and the less experienced French writer Benoît Philippon tells the story of a small creature, a faun named Mune, who must recover the Moon and the Sun, both stolen by his fault. Unprepared for such a responsibility, Mune makes a mistake that could put both Sun and Moon in danger. The corrupt titan Necross wants the Sun for himself and the balance between day and night is in great peril. With the help of a wax creature named Glim and Sohone, the guardian of the Sun, a fire colossus, he goes on an exciting journey to restore the natural order.

But how did all this started? It is said that the first guardian of the Sun harpooned it just to keep it close to the planet, and hung it to a mobile rocky temple, that wanders the small world every day. On the other hand, the first Moon guardian descended into the world of dreams and carved the Moon from stone and threw it into the sky. Since then, generation after generation, the guardians are the ones trying to keep the harmony in the world, the balance between night and day. Cooperation between the two worlds is very important, as one cannot exist without the other.

The low budget animated movie, made in computer graphics and 3D stereoscopy, is very inventive and surprising. The colorful world created, inhabited by fantastic creatures, lights up our imagination. The main characters are the symbols of the two worlds: the day represented by the colossus Sohone and the night represented by the faun Mune. Glim, the wax creature is the link between them, as she lives somewhere in the shade, because sun can melt her down and night can freeze her out. Also, she is the rational one, the one which holds the knowledge, guiding the two heroes in their adventure. As the story develops, we see Mune changing from the silly kid to the more responsible guardian. It’s his way to adulthood.

Like every other story, this is about the fight between the good and the evil, is about love and death, hope and responsibility and, of course, everything ends well. Obviously, in the end, we find out that the evil Necross is just the corrupted nature that lost its way, similar to Te Ka from “Moana”.